University of Warwick
Department of Politics and International Studies
20 May 2017

The exhibition will feature segments of Heide Fasnacht’s Suspect Terrain and Jenny Perlin’s One Hundred Sinkholes, and is part of a larger effort to make holes relevant as a subject and site of learning and research.

The workshop and the exhibition are funded by the Institute of Advanced Study (IAS), the department of Politics and International Studies (PaIS), University of Warwick and a PTF Professional Development Fund from The New School.

Programme

10:15 – 10:45:                        Coffee and tea reception

10:45 – 11:00:                          Introductory remarks (Marijn Nieuwenhuis)

11:00 – 13:30:                          Art installations with two performance-lectures with Heide Fasnacht and Jenny Perlin (The New School, New York) & roundtable discussion with Professor Teresa Stoppani (London South Bank University) and Dr Divya P. Tolia-Kelly (Durham University) followed by Q&A

13:30 – 15:30:                        Lunch


Professor Teresa Stoppani is an architectural theorist and critic. She has taught architectural design and theory in Italy (IUAV Venice), Australia (UTSydney, RMIT Melbourne) and the UK (Architectural Association, U Greenwich, U Brighton, Leeds Beckett U), and is currently Professor of Research in Architecture at London South Bank  University. Her research interests are the relationship between architecture theory and the design process in the urban environment, and the influence on the specifically architectural of other spatial and critical practices.

Dr Divya P. Tolia-Kelly is Associate Professor in the Department of Geography (Durham University). Her research focuses on visual culture, in its intersections with material culture, landscape and race-memory. She has collaborated with several artists to map and recover postcolonial relationships with landscape, nature and citizenship, the role of memory in citizenship narratives and race histories, and postcolonial taxonomies of art and culture in spaces of national culture.